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QUITE POSSIBLY THE ONLY TOOL YOU'LL EVER NEED

ARCHITECT DESIGNS CAKE

THE TOTALLY 3D PRINTED CAMERA – YES, EVEN THE LENS

COULD 3D PRINTED TREES SAVE THE FORESTS?

3D PRINTING GOES TO THE PARALYMPICS

HAS 3D PRINT FOUND A CURE FOR SNORING?

2,000 YEAR-OLD MUMMY'S FACE RECREATED BY 3D PRINT

Haute couture embraces 3D printing

MARS' FIRST 3D PRINTED CITY READY IN THREE YEARS...

SHOES FOR (FLASHY) SPIES

MEET OLLI, THE 3D PRINTED MINI BUS THAT DRIVES ITSELF

RUSSIA LAUNCHES 3D PRINTED DRONE. WORLD GETS NERVOUS.

3D PRINTED DISHWASHER. SORT OF.

HOUSES MADE OF SOIL FOR $1,000

World’s tallest 3D printed human

3D PRINT THE ENGLAND SQUAD AND LET TABLE-TOP BATTLE COMMENCE

ENTIRE OFFICE PRINTED IN JUST OVER A FORTNIGHT

LIGHT RIDER

SHIPWRECKS RECONSTRUCTED USING 3D TECHNIQUES

3D PRINTED DOME SURVIVES EXTREME CONDITIONS

MAN GETS 'WOLVERINE' RIB CAGE

3D print helps to keep up appearances

PRINT YOUR OWN E-BIKE PARTS

Palmyra’s Arch of Triumph resurrected in London

ROBOTS TO GO

3D PRINTED WHISKY!

3D HELP FOR ASTHMA SUFFERERS

Soldiering on

BATTER FACE

STRONGER THAN STEEL, LIGHTER THAN PLASTIC

TO GO WHERE NO 3D PRINTER HAS GONE BEFORE...

Breakthrough in 3D printed body parts research

A 3D printer for craft beer?

DANCER TURNED WIDE OPEN

3D PRINTING FROM SPACE ROCKS

TAKING 3D PRINTING A STEP BEYOND

Disney robot can climb up walls

3D printed façade for EU building

3D SCANNER REPLACES TAILORS' TAPE MEASURE

PRINTING IN 'STONE'

The pollution-fighting bikini

Eco-friendly 3D printed Adidas trainer

3D printed car jack

3D PRINT LETS THE BLIND 'SEE' ART

TURNING NUISANCE ALGAE INTO FILAMENT

A taste of honey

3D PRINT AND BUILD YOUR OWN ROBOT

BIGFOOT SKELETON DISCOVERED!

SHIPWRECKED!

World’s first 3D printed road-ready car

THE LAST UMBRELLA YOU'LL EVER BUY?

3D PRINTING HUMAN ORGANS COMES A STEP CLOSER

3D printing Guinness World Record!

3D printed couture – Live

Nike patents 3D technology

3D printed rugby world cup

3D printed bubble house on Mars

Up in Flames

Bringing Bronze Age music back to life

World’s first 3D printed supercar

Tieta gets a 3D printed beak

3D printed smart cap sniffs out sour milk

Your pill is being printed

Moyupi – 3D printed toys straight from your child’s imagination

Dessert for one

Bringing Pompeii back to life

A bridge to the future

Getting a handle on 3D printing

3D Create & Print Design Challenge 2015 winners

Meet the record-holding X2-VelociRoACH

Making a splash

Join us at the 3D Create & Print Summer Expo

Bradley Wiggins' handlebars were 3D printed

Latest Airbus has 1,000 3D printed parts

Working valve 4D printed

21st Century Robot

Fake eggs on demand

3D printed parts save reptiles

3D makeover for construction

Artist makes 3D printed film

Piezoelectric violin

Beating heart cells 3D printed

3D printed rhino horn?

Flying 3D printer hits the spot

3D printed bionic ear

3D printed beak fits the bill

Prickly dress

Good enough to eat

3D Benchy to the rescue!

Join the board game revolution

3D printing speeds up building Barcelona's Sagrada Familia Church

3D printed wedding bouquet

Breathing new life into Richard III

3D Printed Mohawks on Katy Perry Tour

CLIP – A New High-Speed 3D printing technology

The world’s first 3D printed laptop

3D printing Sophie the Stegosaurus

Father and son 3D print Van Gogh’s bedroom

Turbo-charged pooch

The future of footwear?

3D printed cargo splashes down

Museum artefacts with a 3D twist

Edible art?

3D: Printing the Future

Have you heard the one about…

3D printed vision in lace

3D printed heart helps save girl’s life

Bloom – amazing animated 3D sculptures

Multistorey marvels

Vector 3 at BETT, ExCel, London 21-24 January 2015

Man 3D prints his own kidney to help surgeons

Introducing our assembly guide videos

Hot off the press - the World’s first 3D printed car

Print a priceless artifact

Stick a plaster on it

3D trending in China

How do you actually 3D print an object?

What is 3D printing?

8 things you didn't know about 3D printing

Print your own toys!

How 3D printing helped Derby the dog find his feet

6 things you can 3D print that you would NEVER think you could

The mind-boggling potential of 4D printing

Why NASA loves 3D printing

AND IT’S GOODBYE FROM US

posted 08 December 2016 at 11:46:16

Congratulations!

You’ve collected the parts, built your sleek, white Vector 3 and have, at your disposal, 110 issues of 3D Create & Print magazine to refer to for advice and step-by-step tuition as you continue your 3D print journey.  

It has been our pleasure to introduce you to the world of 3D printing and to help you build and start using your V3.  

This is our last blog post, but the archives and downloadable Design Files will remain online, and don’t forget that you can also order any missing issues and purchase additional parts for your V3 via our online shop.  

We hope that you’ve enjoyed and learned from the series and that you continue to have fun with this constantly evolving technology.  And remember, the only limit is your imagination.

BEYOND CREATIVE – THE 3D PRINTED ‘LAUGH STAR’

posted 06 December 2016 at 22:09:46



The creative potential of 3D printing has no boundaries. Literally. In December 2016, the world’s first 3D printed space art will be created by NASA contractor Made in Space. Dubbed #Laugh, this crowdsourced art project aims to visualise the human laugh in sculptural form and then print it onboard the International Space Station, using its zero-gravity 3D printer.  

Anyone can submit a laugh (this is no joke) all you have to do is download the #Laugh app from www.laugh.ai/#intro and record, visualise and share your laugh online as a 3D model – or a ‘laugh star’, as the organizers like to call it. The laugh star that gets the most online likes will then be printed and jettisoned into outer space.  

According to the #Laugh website, people from all around the world can record themselves chortling, tittering, guffawing and sniggering (OK, those are our words…). The laughter with the most likes after one month will be sent to the ISS to be 3D printed and the sculpture subsequently released into eternal orbit.  



Israeli digital artist Eyal Gever – best known for his lifelike digital simulations of catastrophic events, such as tsunamis and bus crashes – is in charge of the competition. He will send the winning laugh from his Tel Aviv studio to NASA’s Operations Support Centre in Alabama, USA. From there, it will be transmitted to the ISS via satellite. The laugh star will then be 3D printed and sent spinning into the ether, no doubt to the complete bewilderment of any alien life that happens to be passing.   

‘The earliest cave paintings were of human hands,’ explains Gever, ‘which were a way of proclaiming and celebrating the presence of humanity. #Laugh will be the 21st century version of that – a mathematically accurate encapsulation of human laughter, simply floating through space, waiting to be discovered.’  

Made in Space describes the event as fundamental to the forthcoming Space Age. ‘If humanity is one day soon to thrive in space, then creating art and culture in space is equally as important as sending out people and the technology to support them.’  

What are you waiting for? Download the #Laugh app today and in a month’s time your 3D printed laughter could be chortling its way across the cosmos.  

 Check out Eyal Gever’s video at www.laugh.ai/#bio

3D PRINT YOUR OWN F1 RACING CAR

posted 01 December 2016 at 15:25:57


Daniel Noree, who features often in the Design Files pages of 3D Create & Print (in fact, he has a design in Issue 110 – our final issue) has just unveiled his latest OpenR/C creation – a third generation 3D printed Formula 1 racer that you can print in PLA (car body) and Ninjaflex (tires) – along with assembly instructions that you can download (www.instructables.com/id/3D-Printed-110-OpenRC-Formula-1-Car).  
 
How’s that for a going away present from us?   

The Swedish designer’s OpenR/C race have had a big fanbase since 2012, when he published his first design online. His latest is a 1:10 scale F1 car that requires just two plastics, plus a $220 electronics pack that contains all the motors and radio equipment you need to get it moving (or you can put together your own electronics, if you’re savvy that way). Find out more about the packs at http://danielnoree.com.   

Watch Daniel build the car in a time lapse video here:



You can download the 38 STL files free from Thingiverse (www.thingiverse.com/thing:1193309). Daniel recommends a 10-15% infill and 0.2mm layer height for most of the car parts, while the chassis plates will require a 35% infill. More than 50 3D print fans have already successfully printed the car, while others have customized Daniel’s designs.  

See the car in action here:

 

Happy racing!    

Image: © Daniel Norée (danielnoree.com)  

FILAMENT FOR OLD ROPE

posted 28 November 2016 at 15:39:20



Walking along the beach one day, a teacher from Tasmania found himself tut-tutting at the amount of discarded old rope he found strewn around the coastline of Western Australia – much of it small bits of plastic rope from fishing industries.  

A big fan of 3D printing, Marcos Gogolin dedicated the next five years to working out a method of converting old rope into usable 3D printing filament.  

After a few disappointments involving hot glue guns, Marcos, enthusiastically assisted by his pupils at TasTAFE school, created a DIY filament maker that could actually convert melted marine rope into usable plastic for 3D print. Although he describes his cobbled together machine as "all a bit dodgy", the entrepreneurial teacher is working on a business plan and hopes to get some engineers interested in further developing the filament maker.  

'There is too much plastic being produced, it's crazy, it's completely out of hand', says Marcos. 'I think it has to come to a point where to produce new plastic is so expensive, it's not viable any more and people will start to value the resource of the waste.'  

This is a terrific step towards not only making the oceans safer for birds and marine life, but also reducing the amount of plastic landfill clogging up the planet. A great example of 3D print technology and environmental awareness working in harmony and involving the next generation into the bargain. Well done and good luck, Sir!

Image: © Thinkstock/iStock/Francesco Scatena

3D PRINTED ‘MAGIC SHOES’

posted 21 November 2016 at 15:33:47


We’ll be featuring Australian open-source inventor AbilityMate’s ingenious wheelchair toggles in Issue 106 of 3D Create & Print. AbilityMate’s designers, carers, occupational therapists and users collaborate to create 3D printed solutions that make the lives of people with disabilities that bit easier.  

The company’s latest innovation is 3D printed ankle and foot orthoses (AFOs) – or ‘Magic Shoes’, as they like to call them – for children who have problems with walking.  

Traditional orthoses manufacturing methods involve taking a plaster cast of the child’s leg, which can be a stressful exercise for all concerned, then manually fabricating the mobility aid, which can take many weeks. AbilityMate’s solution is to non-intrusively digital scan the foot in just a few seconds, ensuring a perfect custom fit for each client, then 3D print the orthoses in as little as 48 hours.  

The company launched a kickstarter campaign recently on Dreamstarter and received pledges amounting to $40,000 in just 24 hours. The goal is to reach $80,000 and, with those funds, AbilityMate will conduct material testing and user trials of 3D printed AFOs for children with disabilities; get 3D printed AFOs medically approved and, initially, start making them available to Australian children, while sharing their information with the world and open-sourcing their research, designs and manufacturing processes.  

We’ve seen these Magic Shoes in action and they really do make a difference. If you want to help or find out more, visit:  www.campaigns.ingdirect.com.au/Dreamstarter/Projects/3D-Printed-Equipment-for-Kids-with-Disabilities


Image: © Ability Mate/abilitymate.com

3D PRINTED 'DEWDROP' TURNS AIR INTO DRINKING WATER

posted 15 November 2016 at 23:16:21


The world's driest regions have a new saviour at hand in the form of 'Dewdrop' ­– a 3D printed compact atmospheric water generator (AWG) that can create fresh drinking water from thin air.  

Designed by 22 year-old engineering student Jawwad Patel from Hyderabad in India, the self-filling Dewdrop can turn humid air into 2 litres of water in just an hour. In drier environments, 1.2 litres can be squeezed out of the atmosphere in the same amount of time. It even has a hot/cold option, so it works in colder climates, too.  

Dewdrop's battery-powered system of electric fans harnesses condensation, turning vapour into water and collecting it in a vessel below the AWG's working parts. UV filters keep out nasties, such as dust, dirt and any toxic gases or chemicals in the air, so the water is mineralised and perfectly drinkable.  



His invention, which is portable, has won Jawwad numerous award nominations in his native country, but it's just one of this prolific young inventor's designs. So far, he has created a smart helmet that won't let you drive when drunk, a solar powered car, smart drones and many more incredible and useful inventions.  

 'I want to invent things according to the problems and situations people are facing currently,' says Jawwad. 'I also have strong plans to make the youth aware of various innovative possibilities, especially the rural population [of India] about technology and the vast fields they can contribute in. All of my projects and innovations are supposed to be helpful for our national integrity and I would love to continue to prove myself as a resourceful individual in the development of our nation.'

We think Jawwad Patel is a tremendous ambassador for his country and a remarkable young man.  

You can check our Jawwad's own website at www.jawwadpatel.com and see videos of his Dewdrop invention at www.jawwadpatel.com/p/videos.html    

Image: © Jawwad Patel 

WORLD'S FIRST 3D PRINTED SATELLITE SET TO LIFT OFF

posted 04 November 2016 at 18:21:16



NASA is poised to blast the world's first 3D printed satellite into space on March 16, 2017 – a full year ahead of schedule.

 Researchers from the Northwest Nazarene University in Idaho, USA, began developing the tiny 10 x 10 x 11.35cm CubeSat satellite two and a half years ago. Progress was so rapid that NASA changed its launch schedules in order to send the satellite, named MakerSat, into space next spring, at the same time as its National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite, which provides weather alerts and warnings. The cube-shaped MakerSat will orbit the Earth at a speed of 17,000 miles per hour, completing a full orbit every 100 minutes for the next ten years.



This latest 3D printed project is a crucial step in NASA's programme to better understand how 3D printing and 3D printed tools could play a crucial role in space exploration in the future. Its mission objectives are to demonstrate space additive manufacturing and assembly on the International Space Station; multi-user, multi-project satellite architecture; to determine how and at what speed 3D printed materials such as ABS, ULTEM and nylon break down and decay in space; and to capture images of Earth.

The ultimate goal is to 3D print a structure or spacecraft in space. 3D printing really is at the forefront in the race to explore and conquer new frontiers.

Images: © NASA  (top); Northwest Nazarene University

AUTO-RETRACTABLE SUNGLASSES TO GO

posted 28 October 2016 at 09:53:25



It's not just big companies with huge development budgets that come up with the most dynamic 3D print ideas. Very often it's the guy sitting at home, experimenting with his own desktop 3D printer.  

Meet Yousif Ashoor. Yousif is a great fan of the video game Deus Ex and he decided it would be cool to create some auto-retractable sunglasses, similar to those worn by the mechanically augmented character Adam Jensen in the game. So that's what he did.  

He used a Zortax M200 printer and a modified Solidoodle printer to 3D print the parts (which are free to download from thingiverse) and just ordinary plastic filament. Yousif hasn't yet shared the secret of what sensors and electronics he incorporated to make the lenses snap shut automatically in response to increased UV light, but if he plans to market these any time soon, that's understandable.  

Whether or not the sunglasses will catch on is anyone's guess, but it just goes to show what a little ingenuity and a 3D printer can do.

Image: © imgur.com/Annoyingguest

3D PRINT AND AI – A POTENT COMBINATION

posted 19 October 2016 at 20:28:55


What would happen if you gave a 3D printer a 'brain'? Or rather, what would happen if you equipped a robot with artificial intelligence (AI) and a 3D printer?
    
Ai Build, a London-based start-up company, has put the question to the test by retro-fitting giant industrial robots with 3D printing guns and AI algorithms. And their tests seem to show that the outcome is machines that see, create and learn from their mistakes.
 

The company's CEO and founder, former architecture student Daghan Cam, attached foam 3D printing guns to the robotic arms of KUKA industrial robots and then programmed them to create intricate structures. They instantly discovered that the process was painfully slow.
    
'Our robots were blind. They take instructions from a computer and blindly execute them,' says Cam. 'If there's any problem, they don't notice and can't adapt.'
    
Cam and his team solved the problem by adding cameras to the robots and using machine vision algorithms to check the structures as they were printed.  
   
'The goal was to create a feedback loop between the physical environment and the digital environment,' says Cam. The robots could now spot defects and compensate for them in subsequent layers during printing. This sped up the process and print time was cut in half, saving material and cutting costs dramatically.  
   
Prior to carrying out the experiment, Cam had asked a competitor who didn't use AI to quote for the same 3D print job. The competition quoted a price of £25,500. Cam's 3D print gun-wielding AI robot completed it for just £150 and printed the structure as a single piece, rather than in multiple sections that would have had to be assembled after printing.

  
That was just the start. In Amsterdam last week, the company unveiled its 'Daedalus Pavilion' (pictured), a 5m x 5m x 4.5m structure that weighs 160kg and is 3D printed in 48 sections. Partnering Arup Engineers, Ai Build's pavilion took just 15 days to print using the Ai robot and its 3D print gun and cost £29,250.  

Although the stunning pavilion proves what Ai Build's technology can achieve, Cam now wants to focus on revolutionizing large-scale construction projects through 3D print. This is yet another very exciting development in the future of construction via 3D printing.

You can watch the KUKA robot in action at www.youtube.com/watch?v=fpl6EPlCF2E

Image: © Ai Build (www.ai-build.com)

Designing in multi-materials for 3D print

posted 12 October 2016 at 22:36:12



While huge advances have been made in the world of 3D printing in the last decade, it still has been difficult for non-programmers to create objects made of multi-materials, or mixtures of materials, due to a lack of user-friendly interfaces. This week, a brainy team from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) unveiled 'Foundry', which is billed as a more intuitive system that allows you to custom-design a variety of 3D printed objects in multiple materials.  

Today’s multi-material 3D printers are mostly used for prototyping, because the materials currently used are not very functional. Designers typically create preliminary models, make rapid adjustments and then print them again.  
In contrast, Foundry acts as an interface to help create such objects. To use it, you first design your object in a traditional CAD package, such as SolidWorks. Once the file is exported, you can determine the object’s composition by creating an 'operator graph' that can include any of approximately 100 fine-tuned actions called 'operators'. Operators can subdivide, remap or assign materials. Some operators cleanly divide an object into two or more different materials, while others provide more of a gradual shift from one material to another.  


Foundry lets you mix and match any combination of materials and also assign specific properties to different parts of the object, combining operators together to make new ones. For example, if you want to make a cube that is both rigid and elastic, you would assign a 'rigid operator' to make one part rigid and an 'elastomer operator' to make the other part elastic. A third 'gradient operator' connects the two and introduces a gradual transition between materials.  

Users can also preview their design in real-time, rather than having to wait until the final steps in the printing process to see what it will look like. 'In traditional manufacturing, objects made of different materials are manufactured via separate processes and then assembled with an adhesive or another binding process,' says PhD Kiril Vidimce, one of the authors of a paper from CSAIL’s Computational Fabrication Group. 'Even existing multi-material 3D printers follow a similar workflow: parts are designed in traditional CAD systems one at a time and then the print software allows the user to assign a single material to each part.'  


In contrast, Foundry allows users to vary the material properties at a very fine resolution that, until now, hasn’t been possible.   'It’s like Photoshop for 3D materials, allowing you to design objects made of new composite materials that have the optimal mechanical, thermal and conductive properties that you need for a given task,' says Vidimce. 'You are only constrained by your creativity and your ideas on how to combine materials in novel ways.'  

To demonstrate, the team designed and fabricated a ping-pong paddle, skis with retro-reflective surfaces, a tricycle wheel, a helmet and even a bone that may, some day, be used for surgical planning. Redesigning multi-material objects in existing design tools takes experienced engineers and designers many days and some designs still prove unworkable. With Foundry, claim its inventors, you can create these designs in minutes.  


'3D printing is about more than just clicking a button and seeing the product,' says Vidimce. 'It’s about printing things that can’t currently be made with traditional manufacturing.' To test Foundry, the team tried the system on non-designers. They were given three different objects to reproduce: a teddy bear, a bone structure and an integrated 'tweel' (tyre and wheel). With just an hour's explanation, users could design the bone, tyre wheel, and teddy bear in an average of 56, 48 and 26 minutes, respectively.   In addition to the user study, the team also fabricated a custom wheel for a toddler's tricycle. The wheel had an improved structure to maximise lateral strength and a foam outer wheel for improved suspension.  

Using Foundry to exploit the full capabilities of the 3D printing platform could enable many practical applications in medicine and more, claims the MIT team. Surgeons could create high-quality replicas of objects, such as bones, to practice on, while dentists could develop more comfortable dentures and other products that would benefit from having both soft and rigid components.  


Vidimce’s ultimate dream is for Foundry to create a community of designers who can share new operators with each other, to expand the possibilities of what can be produced. He also hopes to integrate Foundry into the workflow of existing CAD systems. 'The user should be able to iterate on the material composition in a similar manner to how they iterate on the geometry of the part being designed,' says Vidimce. 'Integrating physics simulations to predict the behavior of the part will allow rapid iteration on the final design.'  

The paper’s co-authors include MIT professor Wojciech Matusik and students from his Computational Fabrication Group: PhD student Alexandre Kaspar and former graduate student Ye Wang. The paper will be presented later this week at the Association for Computing Machinery’s User Interface Software and Technology Symposium (UIST) in Tokyo. The research was supported by the National Science Foundation.  

Click on the YouTube link at the top of this blog to watch Foundry in action.
Images: © Kiril Vimidce/MITCSAIL